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Workshop: iConference 2016, Philadelphia PA

MEETING NOTES AND ACTION ITEMS (3 April 2016, Bob Glushko)

Time: Sunday March 20 at the ISchools Conference in Philadelphia PA
ORGANIZERS:
Robert J. Glushko, University of Calfornia Berkeley
David Bamman, University of California, Berkeley
Ed Cortez, University of Tennessee
Bruce Fulton, University of Arizona
Mikael Gunnarson, University of Borås
Vivien Petras, Humboldt University
Isabelle Sperano, Laval University
Nina Wacholder, Rutgers University

DESCRIPTION:
The overall purpose of this workshop is to strengthen the existing collaboration and community among instructors and schools using The Discipline of Organizing (Glushko 2015), to promote further innovation in digital publishing, and to enhance ISchool teaching practices through experimentation with new models of collaborative courses.

This full-day workshop for current and prospective users of The Discipline of Organizing will strengthen the existing collaboration and community among instructors and schools using it as a primary or supplemental text for courses in Information Organization, Knowledge Management, Digital Collections, Information Architecture, Information Systems Design, and other related fields. The rapid adoption of the book by more than 60 schools in 20 countries mandates more formal and systematic processes for keeping the book current and to help instructors make effective use of it.
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Topical Schedule (with Links to Presentations)

  • 8:30-8:45 WORKSHOP OVERVIEW AND INTRODUCTIONS
  • 8:45-9:00 STATE OF THE TDO UNIVERSE (Adoption, Course Types, Locations, etc.)
    60+ schools in 20+ countries! Results from instructor survey of December 2015
  • 9:00-9:30 TDO'S CONTENT, TECHNOLOGY, AND PROCESS EVOLUTION
    Erik Wilde's memo about the TDO GitHub repository
    How TDO has evolved... setting the stage to discuss how to continue to do so
  • 9:30-10:00 THE CHALLENGE/OPPORTUNITY OF "DATA SCIENCE"; TDO 4th EDITION PLAN
    Many universities and ISchools are exploring "data science" and computational thinking; How can we ensure that these trends stay connected with and build on organizing, the "raison d'etre" of the ISchool?
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  • 10:00-10:20 BREAK
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  • 10:20-11:00 ESTABLISHING A TDO BOARD OF DIRECTORS (Part 1)
    We need more formal authoring and editorial process, but framing this as an editorial board is too narrow. We have to manage much more than TDO's content.

    • What are the board's responsibilities beyond maintaining content currency? Managing all shared resources?
    • What is a reasonable revision schedule? "Continuous update" is almost possible, but we need identifiable editions for publishing and syllabus purposes
    • What specific editions and formats are required?
    • How balance centralized and distributed approaches to authoring, reviewing, publishing, resource sharing?
    • How should board members be selected? What commitment of time should be expected?
    • Does there need to be a 1-1 relationship between board members and disciplines?
  • 11:00-12:00 RESOURCE SHARING: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS
    Our resource sharing is too ad hoc
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  • 12:00-1:30 LUNCH BREAK
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  • 1:30-3:00 COLLABORATIVE AND CROSS-CULTURAL TEACHING (research agenda, vision, participation and planning for experiments starting in Fall 2016 or Spring 2017)
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  • 3:00-3:20 BREAK
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  • 3:20-3:40 TDO AND SOFTWARE / TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
    Video about the Berkeley Information Organization Lab Course
  • 3:40-4:00 TRANSLATION: MOTIVATION, ISSUES, EXPERIMENTS
  • 4:00-4:20 TDO FOR UNDERGRADUATES
  • 4:20-4:40 ESTABLISHING A TDO BOARD OF DIRECTORS (Part 2)
  • 4:40-5:00 WRAP UP; ACTION ITEMS

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The goals and outcomes for this workshop are based on the results from a survey of 50 TDO instructors conducted in December 2015. We expect to discuss several interrelated issues, including but not limited to:

  • ESTABLISHING A MORE FORMAL AUTHORIAL/EDITORIAL STRUCTURE

    The book's novel conception of organizing as a transdisciplinary activity implies an authoring/editorial board whose members each have primary responsibility for some particular discipline, both to generate content and to review it. We encourage people to help us define the composition and procedures for the editorial board and to determine a schedule for publishing new editions.

  • INCREASING THE SCALE AND EFFICIENCY OF RESOURCE SHARING

    The book has an associated website, http://disciplineoforganizing.org/, whose "For Instructors" section has a collection of lectures, assignments, exam questions, and classroom activities that many instructors have contributed to and reuse in their own courses. However, there have been recurring calls for more robust technology and less ad hoc methods for collection and sharing these resources.

    In addition, many instructors have suggested the collection and sharing of software and associated assignments to demonstrate data models, text processing, computational classification, and other more technical topics in TDO. These kinds of resources are typically managed using github repositories. Work is underway to Berkeley to use github to support a TDO-associated lab course, and other instructors have been contributing their own resources to this repository.

    Student-written case studies are also an important category of shared resources. There are 19 case studies in Chapter 11 of TDO's 3rd edition that some instructors have used as supplemental readings, and at Berkeley alone there are dozens more that are suitable for sharing. Instead of adding case studies to the book, it makes more sense to collect them in a repository like other shared resources. Other instructors who have students write case studies as course assignments are invited to submit them.

    The book's XML source files, photos, and illustrations are shared across different editions, and could be considered to be shared resources like software and case studies, but it better to consider customized editions as a separate topic.

  • BETTER SUPPORT FOR CUSTOMIZED EDITIONS

    TDO is currently published in two editions, but some instructors would like to create their own customized editions. TDO's "publishing machine" builds different editions of TDO based on the inclusion of content by disciplinary and other content attributes. It would be straightforward to create custom TDO editions by having instructors submit their custom configurations to a central publishing service, most likely supported by the same institution supporting the other resource repositories. We need to determine if this centralized approach is adequate or if instructors need more local control, because experience has taught us that often the best way to see if some new content makes sense is to build a book that contains it.

    A related topic is to understand how TDO might best be customized for undergraduate courses. In particular, Berkeley has started work on a substantially simplified book enhanced by the addition of concepts in data science and computational thinking, topics that complement TDO’s core themes. Other instructors developing similar courses are invited to collaborate

  • DEVELOPING A MULTI-YEAR PLAN FOR COLLABORATIVE TEACHING

    The goal is the design and deployment of a MOOC-flavor course whose modular content is created and delivered by experts in each area. We expect this plan to have two phases:

    In fall 2016, a small number of schools plan to collaboratively teach a course using essentially the same syllabus with TDO as the primary text. At least one school will teach in a face-to-face classroom mode; at least one will be entirely online with recorded video lectures, and at least one will be a flipped classroom with recorded video lectures complemented by face-to-face classroom meetings. Ideally, the schools will be in different countries, creating a testbed for experimentation in multinational and multi-lingual pedagogy.

    Lessons learned in the fall 2016 experiment will guide the design and deployment of a MOOC-flavor course in the fall of 2017. In addition to being a standalone offering, this course would host a content repository of modular lectures that could be used by any TDO instructor to supplement courses taught in any mode and with any disciplinary emphases.

    Our goal is not simply to offer a course on some particular online educational platform. Our goal is to make it possible for any instructor to use a collection of TDO content and resources (recorded lectures, assignments, anything useful) in a "flipped" classroom style so that they can deliver a course that best combines their expertise in TDO topics with resources contributed by other experts. At one extreme a course might look like a MOOC, with a complete online course with all lectures selected from the repository, and at the other we have a more traditional course where a recorded lecture or two from the TDO repository is used.

  • TRANSLATION TO OTHER LANGUAGES

    Many of the non-US schools using TDO teach in English, but there is substantial interest in translating it – especially Chapter 1 and other early chapters – into other languages. Because of the extensive semantic markup in TDO's source files, a more systematic and tools-based approach should be investigated.

AGENDA DETAILS AND PARTICIPATION PROTOCOLS

Position papers or proposals are being developed for each of the topics listed above.

If you would like to help write a particular proposal or have any questions about this workshop, contact Bob Glushko (glushko@berkeley.edu)

If you are interested in participating in a fall 2016 collaborative teaching experiment, contact Ed Cortez (ecortez@utk.edu)

If you have software, demos, or other resources useful for teaching data modeling, text processing, computational classification, and other more technical topics in TDO contact Vijay Velagapudi (vavelagapudi@gmail.com)

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